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  1. I’d love to see do a review on the Tonal machine
    2 points
  2. Water rowers are unique in that the only way to adjust the resistance is by adding or removing water from the tank. The harder you pull, the more power you generate within the tank which increases your expended wattage - but it doesn't specifically mean there is more resistance. If you prefer heavy resistance, you can add more water initially and then regulate the power you put into each stroke to modify the intensity. I find I can get an excellent workout on a water rower simply by increasing my stroke rate and power - I don't need more resistance to make it challenging.
    2 points
  3. Yes! The Hydrow is extremely quiet and would work well in an apartment. The only issue is space. You can store the Hydrow vertically if you purchase a wall-anchor kit which reduces floor space when not in use. But it doesn’t fold up like many other rowers and has a footprint of 86″L x 25″W x 47″H, so it’s rather long. While the noise won’t disturb your neighbors, it may be too large for some apartments.
    2 points
  4. This is excellent information -- thank you Sydney! I'll look out for the updated review of the 1750. Meanwhile, I'll try to find a store in my area that has all three, so I can compare them in person.
    1 point
  5. As far as a budget-friendly option, I would check out the Sole E25 Elliptical. We haven't tested this model in particular, but I've linked our spec review of it. In our experience, Sole makes really stable equipment, and they back up the construction with a lifetime warranty for the frame, 350 lb weight capacity, and a heavy 20 lb flywheel.
    1 point
  6. Hey krystal_km, I use the rowers at my local gym and I also really like doing workouts with a fitness app. In addition to what Sydney said, Apple Fitness has workout videos that they release every other day or so. It's what I prefer doing when I row. They range from 10 minute rows to 30 minute rows, similar to like a Peleton-type class with an instructor motivating and coaching during the class.
    1 point
  7. I would check out the Life Fitness Run CX and the Sole F85 treadmills. These both have 400 lb weight capacities. For exercise bikes, we typically just see up to 350 lb weight capacities.
    1 point
  8. Great question, treadmills aren't the lowest impact cardio machine to use but they will be great for walking for someone with lower back pain and possibly some light jogging. It is difficult to answer without understand the severity of the low back pain, we would recommend speaking with your health care provider and getting advice there before jumping into anything serious.
    1 point
  9. Unfortunately, I'm unable to watch the video you added so I can't hear the sound. It might be that the belt is misaligned and/or needs lubricating. If this doesn't fix it, it might be something with the motor. The warranty should cover this if realigning/lubricating/tightening the belt doesn't fix it.
    1 point
  10. I purchased an AmazonBasics mat a few months ago to go on our hardwood floors. I’m satisfied with it!
    1 point
  11. I went ahead and purchased a ProForm with the free month promotion. When I opened the box to assemble there was a card inside with the manual for the free year of iFit! Whoop! Now that I’ve been using the ProForm for a few months I’m in complete love. Definitely will maintain the subscription after my free year.
    1 point
  12. No, the class will start from the beginning again if it is stopped before completing. If the class is in a series, the next class in the series will show up on your home page as a suggestion to start next though.
    1 point
  13. A rubber gym floor mat should work well.
    1 point
  14. You can place your treadmill on concrete, but you might want a mat to help keep it in place.
    1 point
  15. Hi Scott. You're right, they're very similar. I think it will just come down to how much you're planning on using it? What kind of use do you want it for? If you want to use it heavily, say everyday for over an hour while running at high speeds, or if you have roommates/family members that also want to use it regularly, then you might want to get the 7.8. Both treadmills can handle running and larger users, you might just get a bit more out of the 4.0 CHP motor if you're planning on using the treadmill heavily.
    1 point
  16. Like you said, some people may use their arms more than their legs or vice versa. But when done correctly, the American Fitness Professionals Association states that rowing should be about 65-75% legs and 25-35% upper body.
    1 point
  17. Thanks for your question! The Ergatta, Hydrow, and NordicTrack rowers are all well built and solid machines. What really sets them apart is the type of resistance they use and their content, so it comes down to personal preference with those. The Ergatta is a water rower which provides soothing sounds of water sloshing when you row that I personally like, although they can require a little bit more maintenance than other types of rowers. It has gamified content which we found to be surprisingly motivating. It's also great if you're competitive and don't want to take classes led by an instructor. The Hydrow uses magnetic resistance which is pretty quiet and this type of resistance has different levels so it can be adjusted and you can see what level of resistance that you're at. Hydrow has live and on-demand classes that are filmed outdoors and led by an instructor. It's great if you want some guidance while rowing and their content is impressive. Rowers from NordicTrack, like the RW600 and RW900, are hybrid rowers that use both magnetic and air resistance which gives you 2 ways to adjust and add more resistance. They use iFit which has thousands of trainer-led classes filmed all around the world. iFit is great if you want to be led by an instructor and if you want to train off of the rower as well since they have a wide variety of classes. I hope this helps you narrow your search, and you can check out our best rowers page to learn more about these rowers too.
    1 point
  18. JustAddCoffee, I wonder if you could get anywhere on this by simply contacting the company directly. I feel like most companies are willing to work with a customer a bit if you take the initiative to contact them and try to barter with them a little bit. They may offer a few months of iFit, or even a year; or they might take some money off the treadmill itself as a type of compensation for no longer running the free year promo..... or I could be completely wrong about all of this! haha good luck! 🙂
    1 point
  19. All good questions. You are correct that the Concept 2 rower is built to withstand years of CrossFit abuse and is nearly indestructible. This is one of the main reasons it is found in commercial gyms and professional training facilities. Neither the Hydrow nor the Ergatta are designed to withstand the type of commercial environment that the C2 can handle. We don't have long-term durability data on the Hydrow, but we don't hear a significant amount of negative feedback either (believe me - we hear plenty of negative feedback about all types of equipment). The Hydrow feels and functions like a solid piece of home-fitness equipment. It may not be designed to challenge the top athletes at the CrossFit Games, but it will certainly provide smooth, consistent training with impressive content for those who wish to row at home. Water Rower as a brand has been around for a long time. The Ergatta has a few flaws that could be problematic over time. The nature of the pulley system under the seat could be cut, fray, or break, which would render the rower inoperable. This would only happen if someone (or a child) damaged the machine, but it is possible. The handle strap frays along the sides and this is something we've already noticed on our Ergatta and mentioned in our video review. Any wood furniture should be treated with care, set away from direct sunlight, and may require a coat of oil over time depending on your ambient temperature, humidity, sun exposure, etc. The water tank requires a chlorine tab every three months and the tank should be drained yearly or so. While none of this adds up to a significant amount of maintenance, it is certainly something to consider. While the Concept 2 rower is certainly durable - it also looks (and sounds) like commercial equipment. It's loud, looks industrial, and may not be the look or feel you want in home exercise equipment. None of these three rowers has significant issues that would cause us to hesitate recommending them. They are simply designed for varied uses in different environments.
    1 point
  20. Water rowers require a bit more maintenance than air rowers. An air rower may get dust and lint in the fan which needs to be cleaned off occasionally, and if the air rower has a chain drive it may need periodic lubrication, which isn't difficult (it's like greasing a bike chain - super simple). Water rowers do typically require a chlorine tablet every three months or so to keep the water clear. If you plan to move your rower to a different location or store it for a long period of time, you'll need to drain the tank. Once per year, we make sure and drain all our rowers and refill them with fresh water. It isn't a terrible hassle - but it keeps the water fresh and clear.
    1 point
  21. @bdwigginsWe keep all our equipment in a training facility. People walking by often assume it is a gym. However, it is reserved for Guru reviewers and isn't open to the public.
    1 point
  22. Great question! We've heard chatter about a Peloton rower as well, but haven't seen anything concrete on that. There have been indications that Peloton has a rower in the works, but no official word from the company. You can read our blog about this topic here.
    1 point
  23. Just ordered this with their sale going on for the new year and excited to get it! Your review is what sold me—looks solid and high quality.
    1 point
  24. I don't own a rower yet, but just want to say I think the Ergatta looks stellar. I've seen posts on Reddit talk about how people think the Hydrow is the best looking rower, but nahhhh I think Ergatta wins that battle.
    1 point
  25. I've been trying to do some research on rowers and these are the two that I had narrowed my search down to. I think the Ergatta game-type experience would be best for me because it seems like that format is what would keep me most engaged and focused.
    1 point
  26. Concept 2 has a dedicated following! As much as the C2 is a great rower, it does have some drawbacks. It is fantastic for quick sprints and intervals, but isn't as engaging for long rowing sessions. It's also loud. If you are new to rowing and looking for something to keep you engaged while you develop a love for the sport, the Ergatta is a fantastic option. My assumption is, all those C2 devotees haven't used the Ergatta, so while devoted, they are not fully informed.
    1 point
  27. Hybrid ellipticals allow for varied movement on the pedals - you can move them up and down like a stair stepper, or front to back like treadmill, or in a circular motion like an elliptical. This feature provides more movement patterns but can feel a bit unstable if you're not used to it. You can get a great workout on either a standard elliptical or a hybrid model.
    1 point
  28. If you enjoy games and challenges the Ergatta is a great option. It also generates roughly the same noise as the Hydrow. The Hydrow is more of a low-mechanical sound while the Ergatta is the sound of swishing water. Neither is very loud. The Hydrow content is impressively professional and well-done but I find the Ergatta is better at keeping me focused on what I'm doing. You can't 'zone out' on the Ergatta - every stroke counts so I get more out of the session.
    1 point
  29. That's a great question. My two personal favorites for beginners are the Hydrow rower and the Ergatta water rower. The Hydrow is a magnetic rower, so you can modify the resistance. It has an attached touchscreen and impressive video content led by professional rowing instructors right out on the water. If you enjoy beautiful scenery with guidance from rowing professionals, the Hydrow is your best option. The Ergatta, by comparison, is a water rower. It is a gorgeous cherry wood color and sits low to the floor. It also has an attached touchscreen. But rather than video content, it includes games and challenges. All content is digital - so there are no videos to watch. But I love the way the games keep me focused and involved. I find I stay engaged best on the Ergatta. The best one for you will depend on which type of rower (magnetic or water) and which type of content you prefer. They're both excellent for beginners.
    1 point
  30. Unfortunately, we think this is a permanent change by iFit. The free year was a great perk, but we don't anticipate they will offer a free trial beyond 30 days in the future.
    1 point
  31. Hi, thanks for your question. There are treadmills that have just onboard workouts that are included on the console. These workouts don't require a monthly subscription to use and are pretty straightforward. They typically include workout activities like heart rate training, HIIT, as well as a manual mode. I recommend checking out treadmills from Sole, Xterra, and Life Fitness for these types of workout activities. There's also a lot of treadmills that have fitness subscription apps integrated onto the consoles. These require a monthly subscription and often include classes led by an instructor. Some of these are iFit, the Peloton App, and JRNY and they can be found integrated on machines from NordicTrack, ProForm, Peloton, and Bowflex.
    1 point
  32. What is the best home treadmill that won't break the bank but is still a great quality treadmill? Thanks!
    1 point
  33. For exercise bikes, my wife and I use the Sole SB700 bike at home right now. We swapped out the pedals for clips-ins and use the tablet holder to use either iFit or the Peloton app for spin classes. We also have a fan bike that we use but that is more for quick bouts of high intensity cardio. Happy to answer any other questions you have. Just let us know.
    1 point
  34. Sorry that happened. Somtimes finding the right fit for taller people is a bit difficult. Which treadmill did you guys go with? Any treadmill that has at least a 60 inch deck length should work great for both of you. Depending on your budget you can check out the Sole F63 or F80, NordicTrack 1750, or the Horizon 7.4 AT. These are great mid-range treadmills when it comes to price. If you have any other questions or need more specific recommendations based on your budget just let us know.
    1 point
  35. The rollers don't affect the cushioning as much as impact the overall functionality of the belt. Larger rollers have a larger surface area, so they are able to grab the belt and move it along with less friction. You'll notice more expensive treadmills tend to have larger rollers. The cushioning is based more on the composite structure of the deck and rebound system designed to absorb impact. The Sole F80 does have more cushioning than the Sole F63.
    1 point
  36. The Nordictrack x22i or x32i are the most cushioned treadmills we've used - but they're also expensive and don't fold up. If you need something that folds, check out Nordictrack's Commercial line for a few models that include generous cushioning. The 1750, 2450 and 2950 are all good options as well. The Bowflex T10 and T22 both feature nice cushioning as well.
    1 point
  37. Take a look at the Echelon Stride, ProForm City L6 or Botorro R5 treadmill. These all fold flat to save space. The Botorro is our favorite of the three based on construction and functionality, but the ProForm will sync with iFit content and Echelon also offers its own app with classes.
    1 point
  38. At 250lbs, you may find the City L6 or Echelon Stride to have limited cushioning and deck space. The Sole F63 is still a good budget option and folds up to reduce floor space when you're finished. Sole is consistently one of our top recommended brands due to their structural integrity and quality build. They don't have many of the bells and whistles of Nordictrack treadmills, but they last forever. If you have the budget and space for it, check out the F63 or F80 - either would be a great option!
    1 point
  39. The Elite 5750 is a special model designed just for Sears. We haven't had a chance to test that one in person. The 1750 is Nordictrack's top selling treadmill and kind of the best all-around treadmill for the price. Depending on the price of the 5750, we'd recommend investing in the 1750 unless you are able to save tons of money. The lower-priced treadmills do tend to lack some cushioning and don't have the same structural integrity as the Nordictrack Commercial line.
    1 point
  40. I prefer the Nordictrack 1750 over the Sole F80. While some people love subscription content and others don't want to pay for it, you are getting a quality treadmill either way on the 1750 - and you don't have to pay for a subscription if you don't want it. Training for a half-marathon will require lots of time on the tread, and the 1750 has more cushioning as well. There's nothing wrong with the Sole F80 - it's a great treadmill. It's just a bit simpler and has less cushioning than the 1750. Let us know what you decide!
    1 point
  41. The decline setting is more for active recovery, gentle downhill training, and strengthening your knees and quads for balanced conditioning. However, it obviously is not as challenging as running on an incline. Some treadmills offer it to provide increased training variables and it does provide a nice recovery after a long, hard run. But it certainly isn't going to change your overall conditioning like running uphill.
    1 point
  42. Great question and we really appreciate your recommendation. We are working on creating more content focused around comparisons to the Peloton Bike and Bike +. Our #1 recommendation compared to the Peloton is the NordicTrack S22i. Another great option instead of the Peloton Bike is the Bowflex C6. This bike has just as much functionality at a fraction of the cost at only about $1000. You can see our video comparison of the Bowflex C6 vs Peloton here. There are a few other bikes that will be worth checking out as well such as the ProForm Studio Bike Pro 22, the MYX bike, and one of Echelon's studio bikes. I'm happy to answer any other questions about these bikes so please let me know. As I mentioned above too, we're working on creating more of this type of comparison content for our website and YouTube so stay tuned.
    1 point
  43. Hey Sunshine, When you get under $1000, treadmill quality tends to decrease. However, there are a few options. I'd start with the Horizon T101. It's inexpensive but a good starting treadmill. Typically, treadmill speakers are sub-par at best. Most people use Bluetooth headphones. However, for overall sound quality we'd probably recommend the Peloton Tread or Nordictrack x22i. The speakers on both these treadmills are better than lower-priced models.
    1 point
  44. Typically users burn more calories on a treadmill than an elliptical simply because you can run faster, harder, and longer on a treadmill. However, ellipticals engage more upper body muscles, they are low impact, and they tend to be quieter than treadmills, which may be a great option if you are a new mom. Either one will burn calories and contribute to weight loss - it all comes down to the nature of your workouts. I recommend utilizing high-intensity interval training (HIIT) for maximum burn in a short period of time. You can incorporate this method on either a treadmill or elliptical. Good luck!
    1 point
  45. The Echelon Stride or ProForm City L6 are both extremely compact treadmills and fold flat so they are ideal for apartments. We always recommend caution when moving a treadmill - even the smallest ones still weigh around 100+ lbs and can be damaged if they are dropped or bumped. But these are some of the better options for small spaces and/or moving frequently.
    1 point
  46. I’ve been interested in the Echelon Stride treadmill, but have read not-so-great reviews the company’s customer service. Anyone have experiences to share with their treadmill / customer service?
    1 point
  47. We love the new Hydrow rower. It combines quiet magnetic resistance with exceptional rowing content filmed outdoors on the water led by professional rowing instructors. Hydrow offers the best training content on a quiet indoor rower. It doesn’t fold up so be aware of space parameters.
    1 point
  48. a. A water rower feels more like you are rowing outdoors on the water. The soothing “swoosh” sound of the water as it moves through the tank reminds many rowing enthusiasts of the sound of the water while rowing outdoors on a lake or river. Water also generates a fluid, natural feel, and comfortable resistance. b. Air rowers are noticeably noisier with significantly more resistance during the drive with slightly less on the recovery. However, air rowers can generate unlimited resistance and are preferred by those who want maximum resistance while rowing.
    1 point
  49. Yes. The Sole F63 has a 3.0HP motor so it will support distance running just fine. However, the deck is not as cushioned as other models, so while the motor will support that amount of use, you may find the impact becomes uncomfortable with extended time. The Sole F80 and F85 are both more cushioned and probably suited for distance running.
    1 point
  50. a. Good question. The x32i and x22i offer more features than a standard treadmill. Both incline to 40%, decline to -6%, and have sled push handles and a 12mph max speed. This way you can kick your heart rate up for a challenging calorie burn without having to run faster (or at all). b. Incline also engages more posterior muscles, so you activate your glutes, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius more than when walking on a flat road or lower incline. Incline training allows you to target more muscle groups.
    1 point
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